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South Beach Homes and Condos

South Beach Neighborhood & Miami Beach Community

South Beach is not just another neighborhood in Miami Beach – it’s a universe of its own. The 1996 movie “The Birdcage” was set against an Ocean Drive backdrop and actually treated South Beach as a separate country. In fact, South Beach, which occupies only two square miles on the southern tip of Miami Beach, is nourished by the vibe of the city to which it belongs.

Beautiful beaches and whimsical architecture make South Beach a favored location for films, music and television shows and a destination for fashion shoots. On this stage — a fantasy world peopled with models, celebrities and characters — residents and visitors enjoy the same alluring lifestyle: relaxing poolside or beachside, lunching at umbrella-shaded tables… even zipping around town on rollerblades or bikes. Beyond the sun and surf, South Beach is packed with cultural venues, renowned restaurants, superior shops and entertainment centers that buzz around the clock.

South Beach Real Estate

 

Miami Beach - South of Fifth Condos

Miami Beach - South Beach Condos

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Miami Beach Island Communities

World Famous South Beach

South Beach’s human scale puts urban existence on a more intimate level than in high-rise neighborhoods. Its compact area and 25-block beachfront boardwalk above the dunes make walking in South Beach easy and enjoyable. And, it’s only 25 cents to ride the South Beach local bus, which shuttles around town throughout the day.

The Art Deco District in South Beach boasts the largest concentration of 1920s and 1930s architecture in the world, earning a listing in the National Register of Historic Places and global recognition as one of Greater Miami and the Beaches’ unique attractions. South Beach Art Deco District areas in the National Register include Espanola Way, Collins and Washington Avenues, Flamingo Park and the John S. Collins Waterfront Historic District.

South Beach’s renaissance sparked Greater Miami and the Beaches’ growth as a nationally recognized center for film, television and print production, and Latin music. The building boom that swept South Beach in the last decade brought luxurious condominiums and hotels to make it an even more exciting place to live.

The presence of Class A office buildings in South Beach means for many people the coveted luxury of being able to walk or bicycle to work and head straight to the beach, pool or sports field at day’s end. For those who work in downtown Miami or Coral Gables, South Beach’s location offers convenient access across the MacArthur Causeway.

In South Beach’s resort-focused Ocean Drive-Collins Avenue neighborhood, hotels predominate. There are a few older residential buildings, some condo-hotel units (including the Z Ocean Hotel) and two stylish and elegant oceanfront condominiums – the 16-story Ill Villaggio and 14-story 1500 Ocean Drive, both built in 1998 at the quieter northern end of the strip.

Above Lincoln Road, upscale hotels include the Ritz-Carlton South Beach, Delano South Beach, The Raleigh, Shore Club South Beach and The Shelborne Beach Resort, all of which attract visitors to their clubs, bars and hip atmosphere. Residential options in this area are mainly in older condos such as the 10-story/149-unit The Georgian, built in 1979, and Nautilus, a 15-story/269-unit building constructed in 1982. There are also smaller Lincoln Road condos on neighboring streets.

On the west side of South Beach’s Collins Park, a multimillion dollar project called Artécity is focused on artistic urbanism with the restoration of several historic properties, including the on 21st Street in Miami Beach. The Governor is considered the largest original Art Deco hotel in Miami Beach. It is being redesigned with preservation of its architecture in mind to create one-, two- and three-bedroom condo units and townhouses.

Elevating the luxury level is the 40-story Setai South Beach condos at 20th Street. At 22nd Street, there’s the brand-new W South Beach condo-hotel, a noted name in hospitality. Bookending the Collins Park stretch at 23rd Street is The Roney Palace condos, which tap into the luster of the Gansevoort Hotel South Beach.

Lincoln Road condo options include the 16-floor Decoplage, which was converted to 625 condominiums in 1992 and is located on the beach. The Montclair Lofts are at Meridian Avenue and 17th Street. The Meridian, a few blocks north on Dade Boulevard, is one of the newest condo buildings in the area, and the planned Lincoln Square at the western end of Lincoln Road on West Avenue will offer 35 residences designed for a live-work lifestyle.

Dozens of vintage buildings in the Lincoln Road neighborhood have been converted to sleek condominiums and lofts within walking distance of the buzz. Units tend to be small, but architecturally interesting with original features. Some have pools and courtyards. Those with private parking sell at a premium.

Amazing, unobstructed views across Biscayne Bay to Miami are a feature of the buildings on West Avenue and Bay Drive, which include luxury high-rises with expansive bayfronts, such as the South Bay Club, the converted Floridian, The Waverly and the new Capri. The Flamingo’s original two buildings were totally revamped into luxury condos with a new building added in 2007.

Close to the entrance of the Causeway is the six-year-old Bentley Bay condos. The old Forte Towers was converted to condos renamed Mirador North and Mirador South, and the center building became the location for Mondrian South Beach and its condo-hotel units. The arrival of Mondrian’s hip hotel, the first in South Beach to be located off the ocean and on the bay, marked a new era of posh for West Avenue. Mondrian’s restaurant, Asia de Cuba, and its nightclub, have also created an energizing destination in the formerly low-key area.

South of 5th Street (SoFi), Alton Road is lined with luxury condos such as ICON South Beach and Murano Grande. From 5th Street north to about 20th Street, and to the entrance to the Causeway leading to the Venetian Islands, Alton Road is commercial, providing a useful neighborhood shopping and entertainment district.

Homes in South Beach

There is a fine collection of 1940s and 1950s single-family detached homes tucked away on the quiet streets of South Beach’s Palm View neighborhood, which is north of Lincoln Road, west of Meridian Avenue and south of the Collins Canal… just minutes away from the heart of the excitement.

South Beach’s Flamingo Park neighborhood offers tree-shaded streets lined with picture-perfect, Art Deco two- and three-story apartment buildings often constructed around green courtyards. This pedestrian and bike-friendly compact community with buildings rich in architectural detail is designated a historic district.

Nearby Flamingo West consists of about 50 single-family homes built in the 1920s and 1930s in Mediterranean Revival and Art Deco styles. In most of South Beach, streets are designated for residential parking, but in the Flamingo Park neighborhood, residents can easily live without a car.

Often dubbed “The American Riviera” for its beautiful beach and vibrant street life, Ocean Drive is the icon for Miami Beach’s perpetual party mode. Round-the-clock action, throngs of people coming and going, and outdoor restaurants galore are set against one of the world’s most spectacular architectural backgrounds.

Dozens of preserved, Art Deco hotels make South Beach an international landmark of scenic beauty. Ocean Drive is famed as the first Miami Beach Architectural Historic District to be named to the National Register of Historic Places. A coral rock wall borders the beachfront, where the 26-acre Lummus Park flows along Ocean Drive from 5th to 14th streets. The feathery coconut palms dotting the park greenery are reminders of the original plantations when Miami Beach was undeveloped.

The park’s volleyball courts are a favorite with locals and visitors, and they’re the scenes of lively contests, including the famous Ocean Drive Volleypalooza, where modeling agencies from across the country compete. Lummus Park also features tot lots, a renovated restroom facility, shower facilities for beach-goers and paved pathways for bikers and rollerbladers.

The stretch of Collins Avenue in South Beach from 5th Street to 19th Street is lined with large and small Art Deco hotels dating back to the 1930s and ‘40s, with pockets of retail stores. Loews Hotel, the largest hotel in South Beach, was completed in the late 1990s as the first hotel to be constructed in Miami Beach for 30 years. It is now undergoing a multimillion-dollar makeover.

Collins Park

Continuing north on Collins Avenue, the South Beach area from 17th Street on the south to 25th Street on the north is known as the Collins Park neighborhood. Its eastern boundary is defined as the Atlantic Ocean on the east and Washington Avenue/Dade Boulevard/Pine Tree Drive on the west. The Collins Park community is filled with dozens of architecturally stunning low-rise Art Deco hotels and apartment buildings from the 1930s and ‘40s. This area has taken on the cachet of South Beach’s most up-and-coming neighborhood.

Collins Park is an essential part of Miami Beach’s history, dating back to early developer John Collins and his family. In 1925, N.B.T. Roney built a grand, 17-story hotel on the ocean at 25th Street. The landmark Roney Hotel had a Florentine bell tower and copper dome and was described as a “wedding cake extravaganza.” The Roney hosted high society and celebrity guests.

During World War II, the Roney Hotel was used for housing and training Army officers, and in 1968, the original structure was demolished. In its place rose a block-long apartment building with 1,162 rental units. In 1997, the property was redesigned and converted into The Roney Palace condominiums. Later, a section of the property became the Gansevoort South Beach, one of the city’s leading luxury hotels.

In recent years, the city of Miami Beach encouraged the development of a Cultural Campus in the Collins Park neighborhood. Major cultural institutions such as the expanded Bass Museum of the Arts, the headquarters of the Miami City Ballet and a new public library are grouped on the campus and the green space of Collins Park itself.

South Beach’s Collins Park community is also in the heart of the Cultural Arts Neighborhood District Overlay, which seeks to persuade developers to build affordable housing for artists, actors, musicians and dancers by waiving certain zoning requirements. This year, the area became even more accessible from the rest of South Beach as the dedicated local bus extended its route north to the neighborhood.

On the corner of 20th Street, Parc Place Residences is a new five-story apartment and condo complex on the site of the original 1936 Fan & Bill’s Restaurant (later called Wolfies) and the adjoining site of the S.A. Ryan Motors showroom building, which opened in 1927.

Lincoln Road

Ranked as one of the world’s premier pedestrian parades, Lincoln Road is really the epicenter of South Beach, with a range of galleries and shops, including the landmark Books and Books, as well as popular national chain stores such as Victoria’s Secret and Banana Republic. New, upscale office buildings on Lincoln Road and adjoining streets add to the live-work-play ambience.

At any time of day, people are strolling up and down the seven blocks that run east to west between Washington Avenue and Alton Road. The three blocks east to the ocean are open to traffic and have a different vibe, as are the three blocks west to the bay, which are mainly residential.

During weekends in season, a farmers market and a monthly antique fair appear on Lincoln Road. Restaurants galore with every kind of cuisine feature alfresco dining. Three Starbucks and other cafes offer perfect vantage points for people watching. Two leading cultural venues occupy beautifully restored vintage cinemas.

Lincoln Road History

Lincoln Road was first carved out of mangrove swamp using elephants for the heavy lifting. By the 1920s, it had become a traffic thoroughfare famed as “The Fifth Avenue of the South.”  Upscale stores such as Saks Fifth Avenue and Burdines, and movie theaters and luxury automobile showrooms lined the street where Miami Beach society went to shop and linger at cafes to see and be seen.

City co-developer Carl Fisher built his first Miami Beach home on the beach end of Lincoln Road and put his office in a comparatively tall, five-story 1924 Mediterranean Revival structure midway down the street. That space is now the Van Dyke Cafe and a popular jazz venue. Lincoln Road was also the office address of choice for several prominent Art Deco architects who designed buildings in the immediate area, as well as Morris Lepidus, architect of the Fontainebleau II and Fontainebleau III and designer of the Lincoln Road Mall.

From its heyday as a premium shopping district in Florida, Lincoln Road eventually lost its charm as stores began moving to suburban areas. A new era began in 1960, when Lincoln Road from Washington Avenue to Lenox Avenue was transformed into a distinctive, traffic-free, pedestrian-friendly mall. The destination featured towering palms, tropical landscaping, fountains and shady rest areas designed by Morris Lapidus in scintillating Miami Modern (MiMo) style. Lincoln Road bounced back in the 1980s and ‘90s with a major cosmetic makeover. Funky stores, boutiques and art galleries, including the cool, ArtCenter/South Florida, gave Lincoln Road a new identity. Success, however, meant higher rents and a change in the street’s tenant mix. During weekends in season, a farmers market and a monthly antique fair appear on Lincoln Road. Restaurants galore with every kind of cuisine feature alfresco dining. Three Starbucks and other cafes offer perfect vantage points for people watching. Two leading cultural venues occupy beautifully restored vintage cinemas.

The 1936 Lincoln Theatre, home of the famous New World Symphony (NWS), is a training orchestra for gifted classical musicians. The Theatre will be reconfigured when the NWS moves nearby into a new Frank Gerry-designed facility and concert venue in January 2011.

At the western end of the open-air Mall, the outstanding 1111 Lincoln Road building, designed by noted Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron, houses shops, boutiques and restaurants. The 1934 Deco-style Colony Theatre is used for concerts, film festivals and other cultural events. South Beach’s main movie complex is the AMC multiplex at Lincoln and Alton roads. Nearby, the Miami Beach Convention Center brings varied events to the area, including the prestigious Art Basel Miami Beach, which takes place every December.

The Miami Beach Community Church has been in the same location since 1921 on land donated by Carl Fisher.

Flamingo Park

The Flamingo Park neighborhood occupies Mid-Beach South between 5th Street on the south and Lincoln Road on the north. Washington Avenue marks the east boundary and Alton Road the west.

Carl Fisher built polo fields in Flamingo Park in 1918 to attract visitors to his nearby Flamingo Hotel. Eventually, the site of high society’s sporting life and elegant tea dances gave way to more ordinary pursuits, and the park became a Miami Beach community park.

Flamingo Park’s 34.5 acres house 19 clay tennis courts, a football stadium, baseball field, running track and a racquetball court. There’s a Miami Beach Police Athletic League gym for residents and an Aquatic Center that features a compact water park for children.

The famed Flamingo Park Tennis Center is undergoing renovation to bring it up to major tournament standards, and other improvements are underway or planned to make the park even more attractive and amenity-rich for the neighborhood. A popular Bark Park is located at 13th Street and Michigan Avenue.

West Avenue and Alton Road

The west side of Miami Beach is more low-key than the tourist-oriented east side, yet close enough to be walkable to the excitement. Because of its proximity to the MacArthur Causeway, which leads to the city of Miami, the area along West Avenue and Bay Drive were developed primarily as residential.

Along Biscayne Bay, fine old mansions and a few hotels dating back to the 1920s gave way to retiree-friendly high-rise rental buildings beginning in the late 1950s. Most were converted to condominiums in the 1990s, attracting younger residents. Bay Drive is lined with low-rise 1950s multifamily buildings, and there are a few single-family homes on side streets.

The area between 9th Street and 10th Street on West Avenue has become an attractive mini-neighborhood, with fountains and trees in front of a row of stores and cafes with brightly colored umbrellas shading sidewalk tables. Bikes parked at meters, and people walking dogs complete the urban neighborhood feel.

Alton Road runs along the west side of the barrier island as one of Miami Beach’s main north to south thoroughfares. On its eight-mile stretch from the southern tip of Miami Beach up to 64th Street, Alton Road goes through several incarnations.

To the west of Alton Road is the Purdy Avenue/Sunset Harbour area, with restaurants, a small park and marina, some stores and a futuristic Publix supermarket. The North and South Sunset Harbour Condominiums offer luxury high-rise, waterfront living.

Places To Go and Things To Do in South Beach

South Beach Shopping

No longer do residents have to leave South Beach for shopping; the choice of stores and boutiques has grown exponentially, with a new multilevel center at 5th Street and Alton Road offering 180,000 square feet of retail on three levels, and six levels of parking with 1,080 spaces. Stores open already or coming soon are a Publix supermarket, Best Buy, Ross Dress for Less, T.J. Maxx, Staples, PETCO and Vitamin Shoppe.

Elsewhere in South Beach are local, independent shops and boutiques that put a designer spin on clothes, home furnishings and accessories. Collins Avenue, Washington Avenue and Ocean Drive each have a range of stores from famous designers and well-known chains selling clothes on the cutting edge of cool.

The Lincoln Road Shopping District, once known as the “Fifth Avenue of the South," is now a pedestrian-only oasis of tropical vegetation, Art Deco structures and street theater. Macy’s is just around the corner on 17th Street, and on the road itself is Books and Books, a premier independent bookstore with national acclaim.

High-style stores ranging from Victoria’s Secret and Banana Republic to progressive boutiques are open until late at night. Lincoln Road’s weekly Outdoor Antique and Collectibles Market complements a smaller flea market among the funky stores on the Spanish-inspired Espanola Way.

For daily living, there are drug stores such as CVS and Walgreens, and some independent retailers alongside convenience stores, bakeries and ethnic emporiums offering tempting treats. Whole Foods, Epicure and a brand new Publix are located a few blocks south.

South Beach Dining

With dozens of restaurants packed within a few blocks, South Beach rates as a culinary hot spot for gourmet to casual cuisine, with flavors inspired by Italy, France, China, Thailand, Cuba and Latin America. Stone crabs are a South Beach specialty, and outdoor dining outdoors is the ultimate setting.

Locals flock to their favorite restaurants on Lincoln Road, and tourists also enjoy Ocean Drive, where people watching is very much on the menu. In a town that never seems to sleep, South Beach restaurants are busy until the late hours.

Every winter, the South Beach Wine and Food Festival heats up the social scene with culinary experiences to delight the most discerning tastes.

South Beach Nightlife

South Beach’s nightlife has a vibe all its own – glamorous, unpredictable and sexy. Clubbing starts at 10 p.m. and rolls until dawn.

Each entertainment venue exudes its own identity and enchanting ambience with music, food and drink to please different ages and tastes. Dressed to impress club-goers, including diva impersonators, populate the clubs and restaurants that mark the sizzling South Beach nightlife district.

Washington Avenue is South Beach’s central destination for some of the most popular nightclubs in the U.S., which have opened (and closed) on this street. Many establishments have a license that allows them to stay open until 5 a.m. – just the right time for patrons to head to one of the area’s all-night cafes or the 11th Street Diner for an early breakfast.

Washington Avenue’s B.E.D. (which stands for “beverage, entertainment, dining”) has been a South Beach social and culinary attraction for nearly ten years. The eclectic restaurant and lounge boasts large mattresses and mountains of pillows, providing guests with not only a perfect setting for a decadent meal, but also the luxury of seclusion at the pull of a drape.

South Beach History

South Beach is not just another neighborhood in Miami Beach – it’s a universe in its own right. The 1996 movie “The Birdcage” was set against an Ocean Drive backdrop and actually treated South Beach as a separate country. In fact, South Beach, which occupies only two square miles on the southern tip of Miami Beach, nourishes and is nourished by the vibe of the city to which it belongs.

Beautiful beaches and whimsical architecture make South Beach a favored location for films, music and television shows and a destination for fashion shoots. On this stage — a fantasy world peopled with models, celebrities and characters — residents and visitors enjoy the same alluring lifestyle: relaxing poolside or beachside, lunching at umbrella-shaded tables… even zipping around town on rollerblades or bikes.

Beyond the sun and surf, South Beach is packed with cultural venues, renowned restaurants, superior shops and entertainment centers that buzz around the clock.

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  • Master Broker-Associate

    Ashton Coleman, PA.
    ONE Sotheby's International Realty

  • TELEPHONE

    #305.978.7704 #888.38.DREAM

  • OUR LOCATION

    119 Washington Avenue-Suite 102
    Miami Beach, Florida 33139

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